Wednesday , 23rd January 2019



Wednesday , 23rd January 2019

HR Reports

Last Updated: March 28, 2018

Declaration on Human Rights Defenders, 1998 has recognized the Human Rights Defender (HRD) in a broad sense. However only the Teachers, Media Persons, Law professional, Health workers and those individuals who are working in human rights organizations (Human Rights Activists) are specifically included as the HRDs in this report focusing on the issues such as how they suffered and how their human rights were violated within this period of ten months. This report is based on the information recorded at INSEC during the period.

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Follow-up to the recommendations made by the Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances in the report of its visit to Nepal from 6 to 14 December 2004 (E/CN.4/2005/65/Add.1, par. 58)

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Injuries and deaths due to victim-activated improvised explosive devices, landmines and other explosive remnants of war in Nepal

Substantial numbers of civilians, including women and children, were injured and killed following implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2006. The government of Nepal and humanitarian organisations should continue their efforts to reach communities at highest risk through targeted interventions and nationwide media campaigns to convey the risks of tampering with explosive devices or suspicious objects.

First published in the Paper on British Medical Journal on February 4

http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2011/02/03/ip.2010.030312.full?sid=df455827-94d9-42f7-b001-feadb1e0c77c

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Details on victims of Enforced Disappearance
(1996-2006)

A First recorded incident of enforced disappearance in Nepal dates back to 1951. The trend continued during the authoritarian Panchayat era but went up alarmingly during the armed conflict launched by the then CPN-M. Both the state and the rebels were responsible for enforced disappearance.

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Nepal witnessed a decade-long armed conflict started by the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). The war that started in 1996 in the name of “people’s war,” affected the general life across the country.

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This joint submission has been prepared by three coalitions namely Nepal NGO Coalition for UPR (‘NNC-UPR), National Women Coalition and Durban Review Conference Follow-up Committee Nepal comprising of 238 civil society organizations all together (Annex 1). This report is the outcome of a series of regional, national and thematic consultations with relevant stakeholders including the government and national institutions. This submission also includes two different thematic submissions of DRC Follow-up Committee (Annex- 2) and Women Coalition as annex (Annex- 3).

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